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04
October

Sailboat Blue Panda anchored in Izmir

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The World Wide Fund for Nature’s (WWF) Sailboat Blue Panda, sailing for drawing attention to the plastic pollution in the Mediterranean, anchored in Izmir for the events in Turkey. Accordingly, Izmir Metropolitan Municipality and WWF signed the protocol for joining the “Network of Zero Plastic Waste Cities”.

The Blue Panda Sailboat of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) brings into question the plastic wastes in the Mediterranean and serves the concept of “Safeguarding the Mediterranean” and this sailboat has arrived in Izmir. As a part of efforts made by Izmir Metropolitan Municipality to prevent the plastic pollution, one of the most significant problems in the agenda of nature, signed the protocol of WWF  to join the “Network of Zero Plastic Waste Cities”.

We are the Nature
Izmir Metropolitan Mayor Tunç Soyer reported that 95 percent of the wastes polluting the Mediterranean are plastic wastes according to the researches and 80 percent of these wastes come from the land; in other words, they are the wastes coming from the cities.
Pacific as an island of plastic bigger than Japan.

Uğur Bayar, the Chairman of WWF-Turkey, said “Environmental issues and climate problems have reached an alarming level; we are all at a milestone” in his speech and continued:
“Carbon emission has reached almost 3 percent. We are facing a severe threat from the rains in Amazon to the melting of glaciers. This scary cycle of consumption has brought the world to an unsustainable point. 8 million tons of plastic go into the seas every year.
In the Pacific, there is an island of plastic nearly bigger than Japan. If we do nothing to stop this, the plastics will outnumber the fishes in 2050. We are the first generation that experiences the awful impacts of climate change but we are also the last generation that should stop it.”
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